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Kabam has a new CEO, for real?

Maybe a good sign or should we be nervous?



Comments

  • Colinwhitworth69Colinwhitworth69 Posts: 7,177 ★★★★★
    What would make you nervous?
  • AverageDesiAverageDesi Posts: 5,260 ★★★★★

    Surprised no one has said this



    Kabam CEO confirmed

    Technically the truth
  • Stagedear85Stagedear85 Posts: 774 ★★★
    I think a new CEO means this game will have more offers lol, I mean its going to be hey how can we make the company more money and Increase downloads. Better drops rates, better in game content and better champs would encourage people to spend more also fair offers but what do i know Kabam seem to have it all figured out.
  • Well good luck to the guy. Let’s hope he can set the ship straight and doesn’t make this a P2W game guised as a F2P game with MTX
  • “Lee has been involved with Kabam since Netmarble acquired the Vancouver studio and most of the company's assets in early 2017. Since then, he has been president and chairman of the mobile firm.”

    not quite the fresh start a lot of people think it is

    Maybe not but it's a new role with more decision making powers perhaps and ultimately he's going to be the guy who directs the company's vision. Maybe his is different to the previous incumbent. Worth a hope, you never know he might even buff AW rewards.
  • AdevatiAdevati Posts: 437 ★★★
    DNA3000 said:

    "hey, I notice a lot of players complain about MCOC on the forums. Maybe we should shut down the forums."

    One popular mobile game did exactly that years ago. And it had no noticeable impact on playerbase, game quality, or revenue.
  • DNA3000DNA3000 Posts: 18,657 Guardian

    Korean CEO? Netmarble game? Expect more pay to win bundles and more gaps between the rich and the poor. They are doing a wonderful job chasing away their fanbases in their other games. Even Seatin ran off from one of their games after ranting.

    Most of Netmarble's games, including 7 Deadly Sins, are primarily Korean/Asian games that are translated to Western markets, while MCOC is a western game that is translated to Asian markets. The two markets are completely different: what western game players find unacceptably pay to play features most asian game players find necessary to spend. It is a question of gaming culture. In the west, the priority is for the game to be primarily about gameplay, with spending something that should have reasonably but not oversized impact. In Asia, the priority is for every dollar you spend to impact your game (otherwise why spend) and equally important is it must impact your game in a way that is visible to others (because that's how you get a return on your investment). There's much less of a stigma in spending in a game.

    This happens in reverse. One reason why MCOC failed in its original attempt to expand to China (at least in my analysis) was that even with the microtransactions pumped way up, our game is simply fundamentally not beneficial to spenders enough. It wasn't sufficiently pay to win, so players were reluctant to spend. They tried to make it more "pay to play" because they needed to, but it wasn't enough.

    That's just something you have to be aware of when you play games primarily designed for western audiences or games primarily designed for Asian audience. I doubt they would try to turn MCOC into a more Asian-style monetization game any more than they tried to just shove MCOC into China without ramping up the monetization before doing so. You have to know your market.
  • mostlyharmlessnmostlyharmlessn Posts: 1,387 ★★★★
    Let's not forget here there's more to Kabam then just MCOC.

    He has most likely had significant input on the company since 2017, so his finger prints are already all over the place.

    His impact is probably going to be more focused on new ventures.
  • DNA3000 said:

    Korean CEO? Netmarble game? Expect more pay to win bundles and more gaps between the rich and the poor. They are doing a wonderful job chasing away their fanbases in their other games. Even Seatin ran off from one of their games after ranting.

    Most of Netmarble's games, including 7 Deadly Sins, are primarily Korean/Asian games that are translated to Western markets, while MCOC is a western game that is translated to Asian markets. The two markets are completely different: what western game players find unacceptably pay to play features most asian game players find necessary to spend. It is a question of gaming culture. In the west, the priority is for the game to be primarily about gameplay, with spending something that should have reasonably but not oversized impact. In Asia, the priority is for every dollar you spend to impact your game (otherwise why spend) and equally important is it must impact your game in a way that is visible to others (because that's how you get a return on your investment). There's much less of a stigma in spending in a game.

    This happens in reverse. One reason why MCOC failed in its original attempt to expand to China (at least in my analysis) was that even with the microtransactions pumped way up, our game is simply fundamentally not beneficial to spenders enough. It wasn't sufficiently pay to win, so players were reluctant to spend. They tried to make it more "pay to play" because they needed to, but it wasn't enough.

    That's just something you have to be aware of when you play games primarily designed for western audiences or games primarily designed for Asian audience. I doubt they would try to turn MCOC into a more Asian-style monetization game any more than they tried to just shove MCOC into China without ramping up the monetization before doing so. You have to know your market.
    The problem is they don't know their market. At all. Look at MROC. Kabam actually thought they could make it work and try to compete with other MOBA games like League of Legends / Dota / Smite / HoN / etc in a mobile version with a low budget graphics and gameplay. Even League's mobile Wild Rift is leagues (pun intended) ahead of MROC.
  • DNA3000DNA3000 Posts: 18,657 Guardian

    DNA3000 said:

    Korean CEO? Netmarble game? Expect more pay to win bundles and more gaps between the rich and the poor. They are doing a wonderful job chasing away their fanbases in their other games. Even Seatin ran off from one of their games after ranting.

    Most of Netmarble's games, including 7 Deadly Sins, are primarily Korean/Asian games that are translated to Western markets, while MCOC is a western game that is translated to Asian markets. The two markets are completely different: what western game players find unacceptably pay to play features most asian game players find necessary to spend. It is a question of gaming culture. In the west, the priority is for the game to be primarily about gameplay, with spending something that should have reasonably but not oversized impact. In Asia, the priority is for every dollar you spend to impact your game (otherwise why spend) and equally important is it must impact your game in a way that is visible to others (because that's how you get a return on your investment). There's much less of a stigma in spending in a game.

    This happens in reverse. One reason why MCOC failed in its original attempt to expand to China (at least in my analysis) was that even with the microtransactions pumped way up, our game is simply fundamentally not beneficial to spenders enough. It wasn't sufficiently pay to win, so players were reluctant to spend. They tried to make it more "pay to play" because they needed to, but it wasn't enough.

    That's just something you have to be aware of when you play games primarily designed for western audiences or games primarily designed for Asian audience. I doubt they would try to turn MCOC into a more Asian-style monetization game any more than they tried to just shove MCOC into China without ramping up the monetization before doing so. You have to know your market.
    The problem is they don't know their market. At all. Look at MROC. Kabam actually thought they could make it work and try to compete with other MOBA games like League of Legends / Dota / Smite / HoN / etc in a mobile version with a low budget graphics and gameplay. Even League's mobile Wild Rift is leagues (pun intended) ahead of MROC.
    MCOC is not the best fighting game in the world either, but the observation people didn't make back when it launched is that MCOC is not really a fighting game. It is a game that has side scroll fighting, but that's not the hook of the game. The hook of the game is collecting Marvel champions and using them in content. There was enough interest in a Marvel style game like that for MCOC to get over the hump content depth-wise. But this was going to be much harder with MROC, and its monetization strategy did not help matters.

    MROC didn't fail because it is not a good MOBA. At least I don't think that was the strategy. MROC failed because the strategy was to put their own spin on the genre with the MOBA part as a piece of a larger whole with a lot of other Marvel content surrounding it. That's basically the MCOC model. They just couldn't flesh it out well enough quickly enough to hold enough players' attention, and too many other factors were working against them to survive that critical flaw.
  • ReferenceReference Posts: 2,899 ★★★★★

    DNA3000 said:

    Korean CEO? Netmarble game? Expect more pay to win bundles and more gaps between the rich and the poor. They are doing a wonderful job chasing away their fanbases in their other games. Even Seatin ran off from one of their games after ranting.

    Most of Netmarble's games, including 7 Deadly Sins, are primarily Korean/Asian games that are translated to Western markets, while MCOC is a western game that is translated to Asian markets. The two markets are completely different: what western game players find unacceptably pay to play features most asian game players find necessary to spend. It is a question of gaming culture. In the west, the priority is for the game to be primarily about gameplay, with spending something that should have reasonably but not oversized impact. In Asia, the priority is for every dollar you spend to impact your game (otherwise why spend) and equally important is it must impact your game in a way that is visible to others (because that's how you get a return on your investment). There's much less of a stigma in spending in a game.

    This happens in reverse. One reason why MCOC failed in its original attempt to expand to China (at least in my analysis) was that even with the microtransactions pumped way up, our game is simply fundamentally not beneficial to spenders enough. It wasn't sufficiently pay to win, so players were reluctant to spend. They tried to make it more "pay to play" because they needed to, but it wasn't enough.

    That's just something you have to be aware of when you play games primarily designed for western audiences or games primarily designed for Asian audience. I doubt they would try to turn MCOC into a more Asian-style monetization game any more than they tried to just shove MCOC into China without ramping up the monetization before doing so. You have to know your market.
    The problem is they don't know their market. At all. Look at MROC. Kabam actually thought they could make it work and try to compete with other MOBA games like League of Legends / Dota / Smite / HoN / etc in a mobile version with a low budget graphics and gameplay. Even League's mobile Wild Rift is leagues (pun intended) ahead of MROC.
    Insightful is given for precise thought in 6 lines of sentence.
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